Flow. Lots of flow.

Over the years, many things have flowed across the surface of Mars: lava, ice, water, and wind. Two things have flowed in this image (the view is 0.75×0.6 km or 0.47×0.37 mi): Image credit: HiRISE ESP_026541_1840, NASA/JPL/Univ. of Arizona If you know my blog at all, then you might recognize the big structures as yardangs.

Wind-exposed layers

On Earth, layers comprising the geological record of an area are most often exposed by fluvial erosion, as a river cuts through rock (a typical example is the Grand Canyon). On Mars, fluvial channels are not so common (especially in the past few billion years). But the wind has relentlessly worked away at the surface,

Athena Coustenis, Professional Status

Dr HDR Athena Coustenis Observatoire de Meudon 5, place Jules Janssen 92195 Meudon Cedex France PROFESSIONAL STATUS Athena Coustenis is Director of Research 1st class with the National Centre for Scientific Research (CNRS) of France, working at Paris Observatory in Meudon. Affiliation: Paris Observatory, PSL, CNRS, Sorbonne Université, U. Paris-Diderot Her specialty is Planetology (exploration

AI as a Tool for Planetary Defense: How a Computer Could Help Us Make the Right Decisions When Facing An Asteroid Threat

Last May, a diverse group of astronomers, space agency executives, government representatives, and theorists who study tsunamis and asteroid impacts met for a week in Tokyo to discuss the state of planetary defense.  This group also included a few members of the NASA’s Frontier Development Lab (FDL), an applied research accelerator, aims to foster collaboration between AI experts  and planetary researchers expressly for the purpose of finding solutions to NASA global challenges, including Planetary Defense.

Gigantic Earth Globe at the Miraikan Museum (Credit: F. Marchis)